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Home >> Africa >> Botswana >> Moremi National Park Safari
 

We flew into Moremi National Park / Reserve.

We flew over Chief's Island into the Moremi Reserve. Just outside the park, we saw a group of vultures in a tree, and we went looking for what they were seeing. Right around the corner, we saw this lioness with an impala for lunch. Sam explained that the lioness would not have been able to bring down the impala by herself, so there must be cheetah around.  He asked if we would mind if we went to look for them?  Of course not! Sam tracked them, and we finally found a mother and her 2 sons. They allowed us to hang out with them while they groomed each other and rested.  We were only about 20 feet away. They were cleaning each other of the blood from the kill they had just lost. Here we are entering the Moremi Game Reseve, in the Khwai area.  That's an elephant's shin bone that Sam's holding up.  And in case you were beginning to wonder, Sam's at least 6' tall. Waterbuck and zebra. This is a snake-bird.  It looks even more like a snake when you see it move through the water. Grey lourie. Quilias.  You can just see the group to the left of the tree.  We sat and watched for over half an hour as a steady black stream arrived to roost.  Apparently the flocks number in the 5 million range, and like to descend on farmers' fields. Pedestrians have the right of way. Yellow hornbill. We watched as he ate the top bits, and let the muddy roots drop.  Our guide told us that it helps preserve their teeth if they don't eat the sandy bits. Saddle billed stork. The bird on his side is eating fleas, etc.  You see them on other animals too. Egyptian geese. Pumba.  (Warthog). Waterbuck. Red lechwe. Red lechwe. Tsesebe. We watched him knock over the tree and then start in on the leaves.  Apparently when the trees sense that their leaves are being eaten, they start releasing something called tannins, which make the leaves taste bad.  They also somehow release a chemical which lets other trees nearby know, so they start releasing tannins too.  The elephants solve the problem by pushing the whole tree over.  Saddle billed storks. Back at camp, Wendy is relaxing, watching the elephant just outside our campsite. There's an elephant in the distance between the two trees.   To the left, the enclosure for the bucket shower (there is a spigot underneath).  To the right is our tent. The elephants lean against the acacia trees with their trunks and shake them in order to make these seed pods fall off so they can eat them. The night before we left the Khwai area, some elephants came to visit us in the middle of the night.  They woke us up as they shook the acacia tree we were camping under.  In the foreground, you can see the footprints of the elephant.  To the right of our tent, you see the deposit the elephant made during the night.