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Home >> Europe >> France >> France, Trips, January, Lyon
 

We flew to Lyon for the weekend. It is the second largest city in France and is about 2 hours south-east of Paris by train. We arrived Friday afternoon, and headed for the Roman ruins which are on a hill overlooking the city. This is a view of Victor Hugo St., one of the two main pedestrian streets that run through Lyon.

We flew to Lyon for the weekend.  It is the second largest city in France and is about 2 hours south-east of Paris by train. We arrived Friday afternoon, and headed for the Roman ruins which are on a hill overlooking the city.  This is a view of Victor Hugo St., one of the two main pedestrian streets that run through Lyon. Two rivers run through Lyon, the Saône and the Rhône.  This is the view of a bridge over the Saône. The Cathédrale Saint-Jean, overlooking the Saône.  This is the view from Fourvière Hill, near the Roman ruins,  overlooking the city. A closer look at the Alps. The 2000-year-old ruins were apparently discovered when modern developers dug into the hill to build apartment buildings.  This is the Odeon. And this is the amphitheatre, which is right next to it. Another view. The Musée Gallo-Romain right next to the ruins houses lots of locally found artifacts and some beautiful mosaics.  It's built into the hill and you have a great view of the ruins from it. Looking at the patterns, it's hard to believe that this is some 2000-years-old. This is what the amphitheatre used to look like. The Cathédrale Saint-Jean, with the Basilique Notre Dame de Fourvière above it, at night. A closer look at the basilica. Saturday morning we headed for the Croix-Rousse district, which used to be the centre of the silk industry in Lyon. We got smart and took the subway on our way back down to the main part of the city.  It operates on such an angle that it actually uses a cog-wheel system. The Opera. Place des Terreaux. The Hôtel-de-Ville (city hall) - Place des Terreaux. Rue de la République - another long pedestrian road (with lots of shoe shops - not that Imelda, uh, Wendy would know). This has to be the best-looking electronics store we've ever seen. Place Bellecour, in the centre of Lyon. Some buildings along the Saône.  There are many buildings in Lyon that are painted similar colours - we found it very pretty. Construction on the Cathédrale Saint-Jean began over 800 years ago. The inside. A street in Vieux Lyon (Old Lyon). Lyon is known for its cuisine.  Paul Bocuse is one of France's best-known chefs.  We sampled his fare at Le Sud (The South).  It was one of the best meals we've had in France.   Sunday morning we went to the Musée des Beaux-Arts, which is awesome.  It has a great collection of antiquities as well as some famous Impressionist paintings.  Then we headed to Le Nord (The North) for lunch.  (And yes, there is also an East and they are building a West).  Then we took a guided tour of Vieux Lyon.  This is the astrological clock in the Cathédrale Saint-Jean.  It is the oldest in France.  Several times a day those little characters you see come to life as they have for the last 700 years! One of the faces on the clock. Vieux Lyon has been declared a UNESCO World Heritage Site.  The 17th Century Renaissance houses are linked together with  traboules - long covered passageways that link together courtyards forming a chain between two roads. In WWII these passageways were used by the Resistance fighters (apparently the Germans didn't know about them - which just highlights the importance of buying a good guidebook - thanks, Let's Go!). An arch in one of the courtyards.  Apparently this was meant to look like this - there's no column missing. A tower on what was once a wealthy family's house.  Apparently the greater the number of floors, the higher the snob factor.  The tower is actually the same colour all the way up, the camcorder just doesn't like to deal with high contrast. Notice how the wood in the centre of the window forms a cross. After the tour was over we took the funicular up to see the Basilique Notre Dame de Fourvière.  During the Franco-Prussian War, the local bishop promised to build a church if the city were spared.  It was, and he did. A view of the inside.  It's amazing.